Category Archives: Hand Surgery

PUBLISHED: Thumb Ulnar Collateral Ligament Tear Repair

Thumb Ulnar Collateral Ligament Tear Repair
Rothman Institute at Thomas Jefferson University

Asif M. Ilyas, MD, MBA, FACS
Rothman Institute at Thomas Jefferson University

Alexander D. Selsky, BS
Lake Erie College of Osteopathic Medicine

The patient in this case was a 35-year-old male who presented to the clinic with pain of the right thumb but no numbness after a fall onto an outstretched hand that resulted in a forced hyperabduction of the thumb. There was mild weakness with thumb adduction due to significant pain, but there was no evidence of median or radial nerve injury, and the radial pulses were intact. A palpable mass was identified along the medial side of the MCP, suggestive of a Stener’s lesion, and he was ultimately found to have a complete UCL tear of the right thumb.

Here, Dr. Asif Ilyas at the Rothman Institute performs a repair of the UCL with the use of a 3-0 suture anchor placed in the anatomical footprint and a temporary 0.045 K-wire placed across the MCP joint for reinforcement.

Preview of the case: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JxdoYtjgZBE&ab_channel=JOMI-JournalofMedicalInsight

PUBLISHED: Subcutaneous Ulnar Nerve Transposition

Subcutaneous Ulnar Nerve Transposition
Rothman Institute at Thomas Jefferson University

Jasmine Phun
Sidney Kimmel Medical College

Asif M. Ilyas, MD, MBA, FACS
Rothman Institute at Thomas Jefferson University

In this case, Dr. Ilyas at the Rothman Institute performs a subcutaneous anterior transposition on a patient with cubital tunnel syndrome. The patient’s ulnar nerve subluxed upon elbow flexion and extension upon physical examination, which was a primary indication for choosing this surgical approach over other techniques.

This procedure not only decompresses the affected nerve but also transposes the nerve anterior to the medial epicondyle so as to relieve strain on the nerve upon the full range of motion of the elbow.

PUBLISHED: Jersey Finger Repair

Jersey Finger Repair
Rothman Institute at Thomas Jefferson University

Rachel M. Drummey, MSc
University of Central Florida College of Medicine

Asif M. Ilyas, MD, MBA, FACS
Rothman Institute at Thomas Jefferson University

Jersey finger refers to an avulsion of the flexor digitorum profundus (FDP) at its insertion on the distal phalanx, the weakest point of the tendon. The injury frequently occurs during contact sports while grabbing the jersey of an opposing player as the player pulls or runs away. Surgical repair is the definitive treatment for all cases of complete rupture of the FDP tendon.

In this video article, Dr. Ilyas at the Rothman Institute demonstrates the suture anchor technique to repair a jersey finger. This approach was selected in place of the more traditional pull-out button technique for potentially stronger repair, no presence of external fixation devices, avoidance of button-related complications, and ease of rehabilitation.

PUBLISHED: Cubital Tunnel Release (Cadaver)

Cubital Tunnel Release

Asif M. Ilyas, MD
Professor of Orthopaedic Surgery
Program Director of Hand Surgery
Rothman Institute, Thomas Jefferson University

Cubital tunnel syndrome is a condition that affects the ulnar nerve as it crosses the medial elbow through the retrocondylar groove. It is the second most common compressive neuropathy, causing tingling and numbness in the ring and small fingers. In advanced cases of symptomatic cubital tunnel syndrome, weakness, altered dexterity, and atrophy of the intrinsic muscles of the hand may develop. Cubital tunnel syndrome can be treated with either a cubital tunnel release or an ulnar transposition. In this case, the former is demonstrated on a cadaveric arm using the mini-open technique.

PUBLISHED: Carpal Tunnel Release (Cadaver)

Carpal Tunnel Release (Cadaver)

Asif M. Ilyas, MD
Professor of Orthopaedic Surgery
Program Director of Hand Surgery
Rothman Institute, Thomas Jefferson University

Carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) is the most common peripheral compression neuropathy and results in symptoms of numbness and paresthesia in the thumb, index finger, middle finger, and half of the ring finger. When CTS symptoms progress and can no longer be managed with nonoperative measures, carpal tunnel release (CTR) surgery is indicated.

In this case, Dr. Asif Ilyas at the Rothman Institute performs CTR surgery on a cadaveric arm via the mini-open CTR technique. A 2-cm longitudinal incision was placed directly over the carpal tunnel, the transverse carpal ligament was exposed and then released, and the wound was closed. Patients are typically sent home with instructions to use their hand immediately postoperatively, while avoiding strenuous use until the incision has healed. Splinting and therapy are not required postoperatively.