Category Archives: Orthopedics

PUBLISHED: De Quervain’s Release (Cadaver)

 

De Quervain’s Release (Cadaver)

Asif M. Ilyas, MD, FACS
Rothman Institute at Thomas Jefferson University

Irene Kalbianr
Rothman Institute at Thomas Jefferson University

De Quervain’s release is a surgical procedure performed to curatively treat stenosing extensor tenosynovitis of the first extensor compartment of the wrist after nonoperative management fails. This procedure involves surgical release of the first dorsal compartment with care taken to fully release the abductor pollicis longus (APL) and extensor pollicis brevis (EPB) tendons from their respective sheaths, while protecting the radial sensory nerve, in order to decompress the extensor tendons. This video outlines the operative technique used by Dr. Asif Ilyas at the Rothman Institute for performing a De Quervain’s release on a cadaveric wrist.

 

PUBLISHED: Flexor Tendon Repair for a Zone 2 FDP Tendon Laceration

 

Flexor Tendon Repair for a Zone 2 FDP Tendon Laceration

Asif M. Ilyas, MD, FACS
Rothman Institute at Thomas Jefferson University

Chaim Miller
Sidney Kimmel Medical College at Thomas Jefferson University

In this case, Dr. Asif Ilyas at the Rothman Institute presents a zone 2 flexor tendon repair with a 4-0 Ethibond suture with a modified Kessler stitch that resulted in an 8-core strand repair. The procedure was done under wide awake local anesthesia no tourniquet (WALANT) protocol, which among other strengths allows the surgeon to test the repair and set postrehabilitation expectations for the patient.

 

PUBLISHED: Scaphoid Open Reduction and Internal Fixation Through Dorsal Approach

Scaphoid Open Reduction and Internal Fixation Through Dorsal Approach

M. Grant Liska, BS
University of Central Florida College of Medicine

Asif M. Ilyas, MD, MBA, FACS
Rothman Institute at Thomas Jefferson University

Dr. Asif Ilyas at the Rothman Institute presents the case of a proximal pole scaphoid fracture repaired with ORIF via a dorsal approach. After dissection through the joint capsule and exposure of the base of the scaphoid, a headless compression screw is placed anterograde in line with the thumb in all planes. This procedure provides increased stability and improved rate of the union in correlation with the accuracy of intraoperative reduction, leading to improved outcomes for surgical candidates over more conservative approaches.

PUBLISHED: Distal Radius Open Reduction and Internal Fixation

Distal Radius Open Reduction and Internal Fixation

Bradley Richey, MSc
Rothman Institute

Asif M. Ilyas, MD, MBA, FACS
Rothman Institute

In this case, Dr. Asif Ilyas at the Rothman Institute presents the case of an adult female presenting with a dorsally displaced and angulated fracture of the distal radius after a fall on the outstretched hand. The fracture was treated by open reduction and internal fixation with a volar locking plate, and the natural history, preoperative care, intraoperative technique, and postoperative considerations of distal radial fractures are outlined.

PUBlished: Trigger Finger Release (Cadaver)

Trigger Finger Release (Cadaver)
Rothman Institute

Asif Ilyas, MD, FACS
Orthopaedic Surgeon

Vivian Xu

Stenosing flexor tenosynovitis of the digital flexor tendon sheath, also known as trigger finger, occurs when there is a size mismatch between the flexor tendon and the surrounding retinacular pulley system at the first annular (A1) pulley. When the flexor tendon thickens or becomes inflamed, its ability to properly glide through the flexor tendon sheath becomes impaired. Thus, the tendon catches as the finger is flexed and extended. Conservative management includes activity modification, splinting, short-term NSAIDs, corticosteroid injection, and other adjuvant therapies. In this video, Dr. Asif Ilyas at the Rothman Institute demonstrates a surgical approach to the treatment of trigger finger via the open A1 pulley release procedure on a cadaver.

PUBLISHED: Subcutaneous Ulnar Nerve Transposition

Subcutaneous Ulnar Nerve Transposition
Rothman Institute at Thomas Jefferson University

Jasmine Phun
Sidney Kimmel Medical College

Asif M. Ilyas, MD, MBA, FACS
Rothman Institute at Thomas Jefferson University

In this case, Dr. Ilyas at the Rothman Institute performs a subcutaneous anterior transposition on a patient with cubital tunnel syndrome. The patient’s ulnar nerve subluxed upon elbow flexion and extension upon physical examination, which was a primary indication for choosing this surgical approach over other techniques.

This procedure not only decompresses the affected nerve but also transposes the nerve anterior to the medial epicondyle so as to relieve strain on the nerve upon the full range of motion of the elbow.

PUBLISHED: Jersey Finger Repair

Jersey Finger Repair
Rothman Institute at Thomas Jefferson University

Rachel M. Drummey, MSc
University of Central Florida College of Medicine

Asif M. Ilyas, MD, MBA, FACS
Rothman Institute at Thomas Jefferson University

Jersey finger refers to an avulsion of the flexor digitorum profundus (FDP) at its insertion on the distal phalanx, the weakest point of the tendon. The injury frequently occurs during contact sports while grabbing the jersey of an opposing player as the player pulls or runs away. Surgical repair is the definitive treatment for all cases of complete rupture of the FDP tendon.

In this video article, Dr. Ilyas at the Rothman Institute demonstrates the suture anchor technique to repair a jersey finger. This approach was selected in place of the more traditional pull-out button technique for potentially stronger repair, no presence of external fixation devices, avoidance of button-related complications, and ease of rehabilitation.

PUBLISHED: Subtalar Arthrodesis for Post-Traumatic Subtalar Arthritis

Subtalar Arthrodesis for Post-Traumatic Subtalar Arthritis
Massachusetts General Hospital

Christopher W. DiGiovanni, MD
Chief of the Foot & Ankle Service
Vice Chair for Academic Affairs
Massachusetts General Hospital

Subtalar arthrodesis is currently the mainstay treatment option for the management of recalcitrant subtalar arthrosis.

The patient in this case is a 45-year-old male who developed post-traumatic arthritis of the subtalar joint 14 years following a work-related injury in which he sustained a comminuted, joint-depression type calcaneal fracture after a 10-foot fall from a ladder. Seven years after the initial injury, imaging prompted by progressive hindfoot pain during weight-bearing or following activity revealed progressive degeneration of the subtalar joint, for which he was treated with orthoses, corticosteroid injections, and arthroscopic debridement. After exhausting both conservative and minimally invasive treatment measures at 14 years post-injury, he finally elected to undergo subtalar arthrodesis.

This video article details the methods and techniques involved in subtalar arthrodesis. After an Ollier approach was used to expose the subtalar joint, the arthritic cartilage was removed and the subchondral plate was perforated. Finally, an autogenous bone graft was harvested from the proximal tibia and inserted into the joint space, and compression was achieved by two lag screws.

PUBLISHED: Cubital Tunnel Release (Cadaver)

Cubital Tunnel Release

Asif M. Ilyas, MD
Professor of Orthopaedic Surgery
Program Director of Hand Surgery
Rothman Institute, Thomas Jefferson University

Cubital tunnel syndrome is a condition that affects the ulnar nerve as it crosses the medial elbow through the retrocondylar groove. It is the second most common compressive neuropathy, causing tingling and numbness in the ring and small fingers. In advanced cases of symptomatic cubital tunnel syndrome, weakness, altered dexterity, and atrophy of the intrinsic muscles of the hand may develop. Cubital tunnel syndrome can be treated with either a cubital tunnel release or an ulnar transposition. In this case, the former is demonstrated on a cadaveric arm using the mini-open technique.

PUBLISHED: Carpal Tunnel Release (Cadaver)

Carpal Tunnel Release (Cadaver)

Asif M. Ilyas, MD
Professor of Orthopaedic Surgery
Program Director of Hand Surgery
Rothman Institute, Thomas Jefferson University

Carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) is the most common peripheral compression neuropathy and results in symptoms of numbness and paresthesia in the thumb, index finger, middle finger, and half of the ring finger. When CTS symptoms progress and can no longer be managed with nonoperative measures, carpal tunnel release (CTR) surgery is indicated.

In this case, Dr. Asif Ilyas at the Rothman Institute performs CTR surgery on a cadaveric arm via the mini-open CTR technique. A 2-cm longitudinal incision was placed directly over the carpal tunnel, the transverse carpal ligament was exposed and then released, and the wound was closed. Patients are typically sent home with instructions to use their hand immediately postoperatively, while avoiding strenuous use until the incision has healed. Splinting and therapy are not required postoperatively.