Category Archives: Content

PREPRINT RELEASE: Temporal Bone Dissection (Cadaver)

Temporal Bone Dissection (Cadaver)
Cranial Access, Neuroanatomy, and ENT Surgery (CANES) Lab

C. Scott Brown, MD
Neurotology & Lateral Skull Base Surgery Fellow
University of Miami Miller School of Medicine

Cadaveric dissections of the temporal bone are a critical part of learning otologic surgery in residency. Dr. Scott Brown, neurotology fellow at the University of Miami, performs a step-by-step dissection of the temporal bone. He outlines key anatomical structures and describes safe and efficient techniques for these procedures.

PUBLISHED: Cubital Tunnel Release (Cadaver)

Cubital Tunnel Release

Asif M. Ilyas, MD
Professor of Orthopaedic Surgery
Program Director of Hand Surgery
Rothman Institute, Thomas Jefferson University

Cubital tunnel syndrome is a condition that affects the ulnar nerve as it crosses the medial elbow through the retrocondylar groove. It is the second most common compressive neuropathy, causing tingling and numbness in the ring and small fingers. In advanced cases of symptomatic cubital tunnel syndrome, weakness, altered dexterity, and atrophy of the intrinsic muscles of the hand may develop. Cubital tunnel syndrome can be treated with either a cubital tunnel release or an ulnar transposition. In this case, the former is demonstrated on a cadaveric arm using the mini-open technique.

PREPRINT RELEASE: Airway Equipment

Airway Equipment

Nicholas Ludmer, MD
Assistant Professor of Emergency Medicine
UChicago Medicine

Abdullah Hasan Pratt, MD
Assistant Professor of Emergency Medicine
UChicago Medicine

Stephen Estime, MD
Assistant Professor of Anesthesia and Trauma Critical Care
UChicago Medicine

In this video, Dr. Ludmer at UChicago Medicine describes the airway equipment that they have available for when a patient has an airway problem.

PREPRINT RELEASE: Airway Assessment for Trauma Patient

Airway Assessment for Trauma Patient

Nicholas Ludmer, MD
Assistant Professor of Emergency Medicine
UChicago Medicine

Abdullah Hasan Pratt, MD
Assistant Professor of Emergency Medicine
UChicago Medicine

Stephen Estime, MD
Assistant Professor of Anesthesia and Trauma Critical Care
UChicago Medicine

In this video, Dr. Ludmer at UChicago Medicine describes the airway assessment for a trauma patient.

PUBLISHED: Carpal Tunnel Release (Cadaver)

Carpal Tunnel Release (Cadaver)

Asif M. Ilyas, MD
Professor of Orthopaedic Surgery
Program Director of Hand Surgery
Rothman Institute, Thomas Jefferson University

Carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) is the most common peripheral compression neuropathy and results in symptoms of numbness and paresthesia in the thumb, index finger, middle finger, and half of the ring finger. When CTS symptoms progress and can no longer be managed with nonoperative measures, carpal tunnel release (CTR) surgery is indicated.

In this case, Dr. Asif Ilyas at the Rothman Institute performs CTR surgery on a cadaveric arm via the mini-open CTR technique. A 2-cm longitudinal incision was placed directly over the carpal tunnel, the transverse carpal ligament was exposed and then released, and the wound was closed. Patients are typically sent home with instructions to use their hand immediately postoperatively, while avoiding strenuous use until the incision has healed. Splinting and therapy are not required postoperatively.


PREPRINT RELEASE: Robotic eTEP Retrorectus Rives-Stoppa Repair for Ventral Hernia

Robotic eTEP Retrorectus Rives-Stoppa Repair for Ventral Hernia
Alta Bates Summit Medical Center

Rockson C. Liu, MD, FACS
General Surgery, Epic Care, Alta Bates Summit Medical Center

In this case, Dr. Rockson Liu performs a robotic eTEP retrorectus Rives-Stoppa repair of an upper midline primary ventral hernia that was partially reducible but mostly incarcerated, and greater than 6 cm in a 63-year-old female. Robotic ports were placed directly into the retrorectus space. Using the crossover technique, the retrorectus spaces were combined with a preperitoneal bridge of the peritoneum. The defects were closed robotically, and a medium-weight, macroporous polypropylene mesh was placed within the retrorectus space.

PREPRINT RELEASE: Pharmacology for Rapid Sequence Intubation (RSI) Airway Management in Trauma Patients

Pharmacology for Rapid Sequence Intubation (RSI) Airway Management in Trauma Patients
UChicago Medicine

Laura Celmins, PharmD, BCPS, BCCCP
Clinical Pharmacy Specialist
Emergency Medicine

In this video, Laura Celmins, a clinical pharmacist in the emergency department at UChicago Medicine, discusses rapid sequence intubation (RSI) medications as part of the airway management for trauma patients.

PREPRINT RELEASE: Microscope Drape for Aerosol-Generating Procedures During COVID-19 Pandemic

Microscope Drape for Aerosol-Generating Procedures During COVID-19 Pandemic
Bascom Palmer Eye Institute

C. Scott Brown, MD
Neurotology and Lateral Skull Base Surgery Fellow
University of Miami Miller School of Medicine

Fred F. Telischi, MEE, MD, FACS
James R. Chandler Chair in Otolaryngology
Chairman of Otolaryngology and Professor, Neurological Surgery and Biomedical Engineering
University of Miami Miller School of Medicine

During the COVID-19 pandemic, viral transmission via aerosolized particles poses the risk of infecting operating room staff. In this video, Dr. Telischi at the University of Miami demonstrates one of several techniques for draping the microscope during cochlear implant surgery.

Published: Pancreatic Debridement via Sinus Tract Endoscopy

Pancreatic Debridement via Sinus Tract Endoscopy
Massachusetts General Hospital

Peter Fagenholz, MD
Assistant Professor of Surgery
Massachusetts General Hospital
Harvard Medical School

This patient is a 58-year-old male who was in a motor vehicle accident and developed a persistent necrotic collection adjacent to the pancreatic tail that did not improve with percutaneous drainage. Here, Dr. Peter Fagenholz at MGH performs a pancreatic debridement using sinus tract endoscopy (STE), a minimally-invasive technique for debridement of dead or infected tissue.

STE and other minimally-invasive techniques have significantly decreased morbidity and mortality for patients undergoing intervention for infected pancreatic necrosis. Common management principles include early non-interventional management to allow the necrosis to wall off, initial intervention with minimally-invasive drainage, and minimally-invasive necrosectomy addressing clearly demarcated necrosis.

STE involves the placement of a percutaneous drain followed by fluoroscopically-guided dilation of the drain tract to allow for placement of a working sheath, through which an endoscope can be introduced to debride the peripancreatic necrosis. After debridement, a drain is then replaced through the same tract.

PREPRINT RELEASE: Prophylactic Laparoscopic Bilateral Gonadectomy for Complete Androgen Insensitivity Syndrome

Prophylactic Laparoscopic Bilateral Gonadectomy for Complete Androgen Insensitivity Syndrome
University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences

J. Corbin Norton, MD
Department of Urology
University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences

Stephen J. Canon, MD
Department of Pediatric Urology
Arkansas Children’s Hospital

Amrit Singh, MD
Department of Pathology
University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences / Arkansas Children’s Hospital

Laura L. Hollenbach, MD
Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology
University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences

Georgia Gamble, MD
Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology
University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences

Laura A. Gonzalez-Krellwitz, MD
Department of Pathology
University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences / Arkansas Children’s Hospital

The patient, in this case, is a 15-year-old female who presented with primary amenorrhea and who on work-up was found to have complete androgen insensitivity syndrome. Here, Dr. Canon at the University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences performs a prophylactic laparoscopic bilateral gonadectomy to reduce her future risk for intra-abdominal testicular malignancies. Final pathology results showed a rare case of bilateral germ cell neoplasia in situ and bilateral paratesticular leiomyomas and reinforced the decision to intervene early allowing for the removal of the gonads prior to their conversion to formal germ cell tumors.