Category Archives: Orthopedics

PUBLISHED: Cubital Tunnel Release (Cadaver)

Cubital Tunnel Release
Rothman Institute

Asif M. Ilyas, MD
Professor of Orthopaedic Surgery
Program Director of Hand Surgery
Rothman Institute, Thomas Jefferson University

Cubital tunnel syndrome is a condition that affects the ulnar nerve as it crosses the medial elbow through the retrocondylar groove. It is the second most common compressive neuropathy, causing tingling and numbness in the ring and small fingers. In advanced cases of symptomatic cubital tunnel syndrome, weakness, altered dexterity, and atrophy of the intrinsic muscles of the hand may develop. Cubital tunnel syndrome can be treated with either a cubital tunnel release or an ulnar transposition. In this case, the former is demonstrated on a cadaveric arm using the mini-open technique.

PUBLISHED: Carpal Tunnel Release (Cadaver)

Carpal Tunnel Release (Cadaver)
Rothman Institute

Asif M. Ilyas, MD
Professor of Orthopaedic Surgery
Program Director of Hand Surgery
Rothman Institute, Thomas Jefferson University

Carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) is the most common peripheral compression neuropathy and results in symptoms of numbness and paresthesia in the thumb, index finger, middle finger, and half of the ring finger. When CTS symptoms progress and can no longer be managed with nonoperative measures, carpal tunnel release (CTR) surgery is indicated.

In this case, Dr. Asif Ilyas at the Rothman Institute performs CTR surgery on a cadaveric arm via the mini-open CTR technique. A 2-cm longitudinal incision was placed directly over the carpal tunnel, the transverse carpal ligament was exposed and then released, and the wound was closed. Patients are typically sent home with instructions to use their hand immediately postoperatively, while avoiding strenuous use until the incision has healed. Splinting and therapy are not required postoperatively.


PUBLISHED: Less Invasive Stabilization System (LISS) for Distal Femur Fracture Repair

Less Invasive Stabilization System (LISS) for Distal Femur Fracture Repair
Brigham and Women’s Hospital

Michael J. Weaver, MD
Associate Orthopaedic Surgeon, Brigham and Women’s Hospital
Assistant Professor of Orthopedic Surgery, Harvard Medical School
Brigham and Women’s Hospital

The patient in this case is an 81-year-old male with dementia who sustained an unwitnessed fall that resulted in a displaced intra-articular distal femur fracture. Here, Dr. Weaver at Brigham and Women’s Hospital repairs the fracture by performing an open reduction and internal fixation with a LISS plate. An anterolateral approach was used to visualize the joint surface and obtain an anatomic reduction of the articular surface, and a percutaneously-placed lateral lock plate was used to bridge the area of comminution while restoring length, alignment, and rotation to hopefully allow for biologic fixation that permits the bone to heal well.

PREPRINT RELEASE: Ankle-Brachial Index, CT Angiography, and Proximal Tibial Traction for GSW Femoral Fracture

Ankle-Brachial Index, CT Angiography, and Proximal Tibial Traction for GSW Femoral Fracture
UChicago Medicine

Jack Kent, MD
Resident Physician
General Surgery

James Jeffries, MD
Resident Physician
Radiology

Andrew Straszewski, MD
Resident Physician
Orthopaedics

Kenneth Wilson, MD, FACS
Associate Professor of Surgery

In another trauma case with UChicago Medicine, Drs. Kent, Jeffries, Straszewski, and Wilson evaluate and treat a patient with a gunshot wound and femoral fracture. An ABI was obtained, CT angiography was evaluated, and proximal tibial traction was performed for pain management.

PREPRINT RELEASE: Flexor Digitorum Superficialis to Flexor Digitorum Profundus (STP) Transfer, Adductor Release, and Z-Plasty for a Pediatric, Stroke-Induced Left Hand Spastic Contracture


Flexor Digitorum Superficialis to Flexor Digitorum Profundus (STP) Transfer, Adductor Release, and Z-Plasty for a Pediatric, Stroke-Induced Left Hand Spastic Contracture
Hospital Leonardo Martinez, Honduras

Sudhir B. Rao, MD
Big Rapids Orthopaedics

Mark N. Perlmutter, MS, MD, FICS, FAANOS
Carolina Regional Orthopaedics

The patient in this case is a 15-year-old female who had a stroke several years ago and now has a left hand spastic contracture. Here, Dr. Rao and Dr. Perlmutter perform an STP transfer, an adductor release, and a Z-plasty to lengthen the flexor tendons of the hand and repair her thumb-in-palm deformity. This case was performed during a surgical mission to Honduras with the World Surgical Foundation.