Tag Archives: Ortho

PUBLISHED: Subtalar Arthrodesis for Post-Traumatic Subtalar Arthritis

Subtalar Arthrodesis for Post-Traumatic Subtalar Arthritis
Massachusetts General Hospital

Christopher W. DiGiovanni, MD
Chief of the Foot & Ankle Service
Vice Chair for Academic Affairs
Massachusetts General Hospital

Subtalar arthrodesis is currently the mainstay treatment option for the management of recalcitrant subtalar arthrosis.

The patient in this case is a 45-year-old male who developed post-traumatic arthritis of the subtalar joint 14 years following a work-related injury in which he sustained a comminuted, joint-depression type calcaneal fracture after a 10-foot fall from a ladder. Seven years after the initial injury, imaging prompted by progressive hindfoot pain during weight-bearing or following activity revealed progressive degeneration of the subtalar joint, for which he was treated with orthoses, corticosteroid injections, and arthroscopic debridement. After exhausting both conservative and minimally invasive treatment measures at 14 years post-injury, he finally elected to undergo subtalar arthrodesis.

This video article details the methods and techniques involved in subtalar arthrodesis. After an Ollier approach was used to expose the subtalar joint, the arthritic cartilage was removed and the subchondral plate was perforated. Finally, an autogenous bone graft was harvested from the proximal tibia and inserted into the joint space, and compression was achieved by two lag screws.

PUBLISHED: Cubital Tunnel Release (Cadaver)

Cubital Tunnel Release

Asif M. Ilyas, MD
Professor of Orthopaedic Surgery
Program Director of Hand Surgery
Rothman Institute, Thomas Jefferson University

Cubital tunnel syndrome is a condition that affects the ulnar nerve as it crosses the medial elbow through the retrocondylar groove. It is the second most common compressive neuropathy, causing tingling and numbness in the ring and small fingers. In advanced cases of symptomatic cubital tunnel syndrome, weakness, altered dexterity, and atrophy of the intrinsic muscles of the hand may develop. Cubital tunnel syndrome can be treated with either a cubital tunnel release or an ulnar transposition. In this case, the former is demonstrated on a cadaveric arm using the mini-open technique.

PUBLISHED: Carpal Tunnel Release (Cadaver)

Carpal Tunnel Release (Cadaver)

Asif M. Ilyas, MD
Professor of Orthopaedic Surgery
Program Director of Hand Surgery
Rothman Institute, Thomas Jefferson University

Carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) is the most common peripheral compression neuropathy and results in symptoms of numbness and paresthesia in the thumb, index finger, middle finger, and half of the ring finger. When CTS symptoms progress and can no longer be managed with nonoperative measures, carpal tunnel release (CTR) surgery is indicated.

In this case, Dr. Asif Ilyas at the Rothman Institute performs CTR surgery on a cadaveric arm via the mini-open CTR technique. A 2-cm longitudinal incision was placed directly over the carpal tunnel, the transverse carpal ligament was exposed and then released, and the wound was closed. Patients are typically sent home with instructions to use their hand immediately postoperatively, while avoiding strenuous use until the incision has healed. Splinting and therapy are not required postoperatively.


PREPRINT RELEASE: Ankle-Brachial Index, CT Angiography, and Proximal Tibial Traction for GSW Femoral Fracture

Ankle-Brachial Index, CT Angiography, and Proximal Tibial Traction for GSW Femoral Fracture
UChicago Medicine

Jack Kent, MD
Resident Physician
General Surgery

James Jeffries, MD
Resident Physician
Radiology

Andrew Straszewski, MD
Resident Physician
Orthopaedics

Kenneth Wilson, MD, FACS
Associate Professor of Surgery

In another trauma case with UChicago Medicine, Drs. Kent, Jeffries, Straszewski, and Wilson evaluate and treat a patient with a gunshot wound and femoral fracture. An ABI was obtained, CT angiography was evaluated, and proximal tibial traction was performed for pain management.