Category Archives: JoMI in Surgical Education

OTO-Open: The Role of Video Atlases in Surgical Education

Surgical videos are a valuable resource in medical education – they help residents and students prepare for the operating room.


Dr. Scott Brown, the medical editor responsible for the creation of the Otolaryngology Section at JOMI, has published in OTO-Open an article “Development of a Surgical Video Atlas for Resident Education: 3-Year Experience“.  In this article, Dr. Brown discusses his journey, selection of cases, filming processes and challenges, and adoption of the content by residents and students.  Dr. Brown also discusses how surgical video atlases impact surgical training and the role they will play for ENT and other surgical residencies in the coming years.

https://doi.org/10.1177/2473974X20939067

Why are JOMI Video-Articles So Long?

On occasion, we get an inquiry along the lines of “Why are JOMI’s video-articles so long? Why don’t you make shorter videos? That would be so helpful!”

Short videos are tremendously helpful. Eventually, we may begin offering shorter content alongside the long-form articles. However, the goal of JOMI is not to do quick reviews, but to offer long-form virtual shadowing experiences. JOMI is a unique resource offering a deeper educational experience.

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State of Surgical Video Report

Link to full report: https://jomi.com/report-state-surgical-video/

report

Today, many resources for surgical videos are accessible online, each with its own purpose and intended audience. The goal of this study is to ensure that the modern surgical student and teacher are aware of 1) which resources are available, 2) their intended purposes, and 3) their value as an educational tool. Continue reading State of Surgical Video Report

Surgical Video and JoMI in the World of Flipped-Classroom Education

BlogPicFinal1The flipped-classroom model is making waves in medical school education. In the past two years, the medical schools of Stanford, Duke, UCSF, University of Washington and University of Michigan have been working together to develop a revolutionary flipped classroom course in immunology and microbiology. Rather than learning from textbooks and lectures, students are to study these topics outside of class through specially designed video case studies. In the classroom, students will practice clinical decision-making as a team, even during the first two years of medical school.

A flipped classroom is so called because it inverts the traditional classroom structure of in-class lectures and out-of-class problem solving. The model requires students to watch video lectures in preparation for class so that class time can be used for personal interactions with teachers and other students. While such an arrangement may seem feasible for non-surgical higher medical education, as in the cases of immunology and microbiology, we might ask if, why, and how the flipped-classroom model is appropriate for surgical education.

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JoMI used in Haiti for Surgical Education (HAAOT 2015, Port-au-Prince, Haiti)

conf picJoMI’s surgical videos took a trip to Haiti. The Haitian Annual Assembly of Orthopaedic Trauma (HAAOT) is a three-day program held annually in Port-au-Prince and is the only organized orthopaedic continuing medical education course in the country.

Continue reading JoMI used in Haiti for Surgical Education (HAAOT 2015, Port-au-Prince, Haiti)